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Writing Styles: Basic Chicago Style

Basic APA, Chicago Style and MLA documentation.

Format, Sections and Title Page: Chicago Style

Format

  • Compose using Times New Roman, 10-12 point font
  • Double spaced text
  • One inch margins on all sides
  • One space after each end punctuation
  • Page numbers: Start with first page of text, add page numbers at the top center or bottom center of the page.

Sections

  • Title Page
  • Text Pages -- the body of your paper
  • Footnotes -- citations for sources that contain information about the author, content, copyright permissions, or tables.
  • Bibliography -- list of sources used in your paper.
  • Appendices -- materials relevant to your paper's topic that would be too distracting if presented within the paper (ex. charts, tests, questionnaires, interviews).

Title Page

  • The title of the paper is centered a third of the way down the page.
  • Two thirds of the page down, type your name, class information, and date due, each on a separate line.
  • No header on the title page.

Footnotes   Chicago Style uses numerical footnotes within the text. See next section for more information.

Bibliography   In addition to the footnote citation, Chicago style requires a separate bibliography page. Entries in the bibliography contain the same information in the footnotes with the exception of page numbers.

A Note About Titles

  • Titles of articles, chapters, essays, short stories, poems, songs, and photographs should be in quotation marks (ex. "The Rhodora").
  • Titles of books, pamphlets, periodicals, newspapers, plays, works of art, albums, movies, television programs, and catalog titles should be italicized (ex. Classical Philology).
  • Titles of websites, book series, editions, broadcast networks and channels, artistic works of antiquity with unknown creators are only capitalized (ex. The History Channel).
  • Titles of parts of a book (foreword, preface, appendix) are only lowercased (ex. foreword)

Footnotes: Chicago Style

Footnotes Chicago Style uses numerical footnotes within the text. The footnote should be added after the end punctuation and should include:

  • Author
  • Title of cited work
  • Publishing city and the publisher
  • Year of publication
  • Page range used

Throughout a paper, even when starting a new paragraph or page, the footnotes should be in numerical order (1,2,3, etc.).

When a source is used more than once in a paper, the author(s) and title of the work may be shortened.

Example of footnote for direct quote:

Susan G. Cole explains, "The Greek word grammatikos ('literate') originally meant 'knowing the alphabet' and the word first appeared in Xenophon."1  [Note: Footnote numbers should be elevated as superscript, or on the same level as the text.]

1Susan G. Cole, "Could Greek Women Read and Write?." Women's Studies 8(1981): 129, Accessed February 18, 2013, doi:10.1080/00497878.1981.9978534

Example of footnote for a paraphrased text:

Schliemann and Calvert first suggested that the ancient city of Troy could be found on a site now known in Turkey as Hisarlik.2

2Heinrich Schliemann, Troja (New York: Benjamin Bloom Inc.,1884), 277.  [Note: Footnote numbers should be elevated as superscript, or on the same level as the text.]

IBID.

Ibid. is used when a source is cited consecutively. The source is cited fully once, and when it is used again for the next footnote, it may be cited as Ibid. If it is the same source, but the infomation used is found on a different page, add the page number after Ibid.

Example of Ibid.:

Schliemann and Calvert first suggested that the ancient city of Troy could be found on a site now known in Turkey as Hisarlik.2 It is on this site that Schliemann claimed to have found "Priam's Treasure."3

2Heinrich Schliemann, Troja (New York: Benjamin Bloom Inc., 1884), 277.

3Ibid., 279.