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Writing Styles: Chicago: Bibliography

Basic APA, Chicago Style and MLA documentation.

Books: Chicago Style

Information Needed:

  • Author(s)
  • Title
  • Publishing city and the publisher
  • Year of publication
  • Pages(s) used (for footnote only)

One Author

  • Footnote

First use:

Sue Blundell, Women in Ancient Greece (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1995), 40.

Subsequent uses:

Blundell, Women in Ancient Greece, 43.

  • Bibliography Entry

Blundell, Sue. Women in Ancient Greece. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1995.

Two or More Authors

  • Footnote

First use:

Michael M. Austin and Pierre Vidal Naquet, Economic and Social History of Ancient Greece: An Introduction (Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1977), 309.

Subsequent Uses:

Austin, Economic and Social History, 350.

  • Bibliography Entry

Austin, Michael M., and Pierre Vidal Naquet. Economic and Social History of Ancient Greece: An Introduction. Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1977.

Book with an Editor/Compiler/Translator

  • Footnote

First use:

Albert Camus, The Plague,  trans. Stuart Gilbert (New York: Knopf, 1948), 62-63.

Subsequent uses:

Camus, The Plague, 63.

  • Bibliography Entry

Camus, Albert. The Plague. Translated by Stuart Gilbert. New York: Knopf, 1948.

Bible

  • Footnote

First use:

1 Thess. 4:11, 5:2-5, 5:14 (New Revised Standard Version).

Subsequent uses:

Ruth 3:14

  • Bibliography Entry

You do not need to include the Bible on your bibliography page.

Websites: Chicago Style

Websites require:

  • Author, if known
  • Title of website (ex. CNN, Google)
  • Title of article/source
  • Date of creation or modification
  • Date accessed
  • Entire URL of website
  • Footnote

First use:

"Google Privacy Policy," last modified March 11, 2009, http://www.google.com/intl/en/privacypolicy.html.

Subsequent uses:

"Google Privacy Policy."

  • Bibliography Entry

"Google Privacy Policy. " Last modified March 11, 2009, http://www.google.com/intl/en/privacypolicy.html.

General Rules

  • Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) footnotes are indented like a paragraph.
  • CMS bibliography entry uses a hanging indent.
  • CMS footnotes use , [a comma] to separate information.
  • CMS bibliography entry uses . [a period] between elements.

Journal Articles: Chicago Style

Information Needed:

  • Author(s)
  • Title of article
  • Title of journal
  • Volume and issue number of journal (if provided)
  • Year of publication
  • Page range of the article
  • Date the source was found
  • URL or DOI number if using an online article

Article in a print journal    

  • Footnote

Joshua I. Weinstein, "The Market in Plato's Republic," Classical Philology 104 (2009): 440.

Subsequent uses:

Weinstein, "Plato's Republic," 452-253.

  • Bibliography Entry

Weinstein, Joshua I. "The Market in Plato's Republic." Classical Philology 104 (2009): 439-58.

Article in an online journal

  • Footnote

First use:

Jim Crow, Sam Turner and Athanasios K. Vionis, "Characterizing the Historic Landscapes of Naxos," Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology 24 no. 1 (2001): 121, accessed March 1, 2013, doi: 10.1558/jmea.v24i1.111.

Subsequent uses:

Crow, Turner, and Vionis, "Characterizing the Historic," 130.

  • Bibliography Entry

Crow, Jim, Sam Turner, and Athanasios K. Vionis. "Characterizing the Historic Landscapes of Naxos." Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology 24, no. 1 (2011): 111-137. Accessed March 1, 2013. doi:10.1558/jmea.v24i1.111.


Newspapers/Magazines: Chicago Style

Article in a printed newspaper/magazine

  • Footnote

First use:

Daniel Mendelsohn, "But Enough about Me," New Yorker, January 25, 2010, 68.

Subsequent uses:

Mendelsohn, "But Enough about Me," 69.

  • Bibliography Entry

Mendelsohn, Daniel. "But Enough about Me." New Yorker, January 25, 2010.

Article in an online newspaper

  • Footnote

First use:

Annalisa Quinn, "Uses for Latin (If You're Not the Pope)," NPR, February 13, 2013, accessed February 28, 2013, http://www.npr.org/2013/02/13/171900243/uses-for-latin-if-youre-not-the-pope.

Subsequent uses:

Quinn, "Uses for Latin."

  • Bibliography Entry

Quinn, Annalisa, "Uses for Latin (If Your're Not the Pope)." NPR, February 13, 2013. Accessed February 28, 2013. http://www.npr.org/2013/02/13/171900243/uses-for-latin-if-youre-not-the-pope.